See What I Can Draw!

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fucktonofanatomyreferences:

Doggies vs. kitties!!! Drawing refs!!!!!

[From various sources]

Feb 9

fuckyesdeadpool:

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

A mouth-watering fuck-ton of gun references.

image

Before you draw any gun, be absolutely certain you are familiar with the parts of a gun. That sounds cliché and dumb, but if you end up wondering “Why does this thing look so shitty?” it’s probably ‘cause you don’t know how a gun works. Know how it moves and what fits in where. And please know where the hands are placed when firing!!! If you hold a gun at the wrong place, you can lose a finger! Also know where the head will be positioned. The person will be looking down the barrel to line up the sights (the two protruding thingies at the top that help you pinpoint your target). Don’t know enough about guns, let alone what type to utilize? Here (the Glock and the “Frag Nade” are mixed up):

World Guns. Thought it was kinda funny. Sweet list though. wmm Varmint never works Fishgun HAHAHAHA OPERATOR HUM! FUTURE gangsta ham heats 1911 snake? snaake!

And if you’re pro on guns, here’s an orgasmic list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_firearms

And if you wanna get a little creative:

image

I’m always a fan of the minigun………

[From various sources]

For our beloved Deadpool fanartists

briannacherrygarcia:

itscourtoon:

bathsabbath:

thorhugs:

compactcarl:

egriz:

im not even an artist and these prices are hurting my feelings 

This is what I have to dig through every time I look for new jobs to apply for.

For non-artists, let’s give you a little perspective.

For me, an illustration takes a bare minimum of 6 hours. Mind you, that’s JUST the drawing part. Not the research, or the communications, or gathering information. Just drawing.

That’s if it’s a simple illustration.

My art deco or more detailed stuff can take 20+ hours each.

Even simple, cartoony things still take at least 3 hours.

Let’s go with the second one. 2 illustrations for $25. Figuring 6 hours each. 12 hours total, for JUST the drawings. That’s approximately $2.08/hour. 

Asking these prices is an insult. But what’s even more hurtful is there are people out there that will take these jobs. Which only encourages rates like this to be acceptable. And there are people who will try to say these are just what you have to do to get started.

I believed that. So my first coloring gigs were just $10/page. The day someone offered me $25/page for just flatting work, I realized just how wrong I’d been. I’m still not making the rates I’d like, but now I refuse anything below $25/page. Because there is value in my time.

In any standardized industry, even ones that pay piece rate over hourly, these numbers are criminal.

Do your fellow artists a favor. Never accept jobs like these. There are others that pay legitimate rates. Or at least closer to legitimate.

Such baby bullshit. Don’t even get out of bed for these rates.

    If you are an artist who wants to make money off their art, I highly suggest you buy The Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook. It goes in depth about copyright issues and even contains contract and model release templates. The 2013 book *I believe* states the average professional charges $72 an hour. This article calculated that to make a 40k annual salary you would need to charge about $60 per hour.

  After graduating from Art Center in 2012, I think I asked for somewhere between $35-45 an hour and got laughed at by multiple big name clients, which was infuriating, sadly expected, and terrifying with over $100K worth of student loans staring me in the face. If they tell you it will be “great exposure” that’s a red flag. Ask yourself how their exposure can compare to your Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr and Facebook pages combined? 

And when you do get a decent paying gig, PROTECT YOURSELF. You have the right to negotiate and revise a contract. Do not start a job until you have a contract signed. If they don’t provide you with one, MAKE ONE. And make sure you have your bases covered. You can specify in a contract that maybe two revisions are included in your cost, and if they ask you to revise the piece more than twice, they will have to pay extra. In terms of payment schedule, I usually do the 50/50 Method (50% before, 50% after) or the 3/3/3 Method (1/3 before, 1/3 in the middle, 1/3 after all work has been received). Both of those are pretty standard in the industry, as they guarantee you will get compensated for your time, even if the job goes bad.

Remember you have a skill, and you have spent time honing that skill and you deserve to be adequately paid for that time and effort. You will have clients dismiss you because, honest to God they think, “Well, I could do that if I wanted. Hell, my five year old does it now.” No they can’t, because they didn’t, they don’t, they won’t and they probably never will. And good luck hiring a five year old. They can’t keep a fucking deadline.

And in a last ditch effort they’ll say, “But that drawing only took you an hour!” Son, that drawing took me 20. fucking. years.

10 Dollars for 1 minute of animation.  Oh my god my heart.  It took my team 6 months and a team of 12 to make a 4 minute short. 

The Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook

I second this book! I’ve had it for several years now, and it’s been a HUGE help in my work as a freelance artist. It gives great advice on what to charge for different areas of art!

stefidelly:


Head’s from an angle pt 1 tutorial. by =Suzanne-Helmigh

ermahgerd where has this been all my life

stefidelly:

Head’s from an angle pt 1 tutorial. by =Suzanne-Helmigh

ermahgerd where has this been all my life

(Source: wolfdogonthemoon)

thats-not-victorian:

lilith-et-adalia:

Thought this might be a little helpful, we hope it’s not wrong!!

And just for a little added context:

  • Elizabethan:  refers to Elizabeth I, who reigned from 1558 to 1603 (this is part of the Tudor era, as well)
  • Baroque:  an art movement that began around 1600 and lasted until the early 18th century.  
  • Rococo: an art movement created in a direct response to Baroque (sometimes called “Late Baroque”), which lasted from about the 1710s to around the time of the French Revolution (depending on the historian you ask).
  • Georgian:  refers to the rules of Georges I, II, III, and IV (1714 to 1830).  
  • Regency:  the time when George IV ascended the throne due to his father’s mental illness.  It technically lasted from 1811 to 1820, but some will use this term for all pre-Victorian 19th century.  
  • Victorian:  Queen Victoria’s reign from 1837 to 1901 (but will sometimes be considered to start earlier due to the Reform Act of 1832)

(Source: Lilith-et-Adalia)

thesanityclause:

damnitfeelsgoodtobeafangirl:

rollingstone:

Archer art director Neal Holman walks us through a scene’s animation process.

This is an awesome little article going through our process~

Your questions answered. Also Neal’s a cool dude.

thesanityclause:

damnitfeelsgoodtobeafangirl:

rollingstone:

Archer art director Neal Holman walks us through a scene’s animation process.

This is an awesome little article going through our process~

Your questions answered. Also Neal’s a cool dude.

Jan 9
erikkwakkel:

Gifs before gifs
We all love gifs - those highly entertaining movable feasts that are so popular on Tumblr. Here is one, but it is one with a history that predates the internet. You are looking at a gif of a phenakistiscope, a 19th-century revolving paper disk imprinted with a series of drawings, which was spun so as to produce a moving image. The device was invented around 1840 by Joseph Plateau. Dancing figures, jumping monkeys, acrobats, and figures jumping into the mouths of lions: Plateau’s stroboscopic disks produced highly entertaining mini-movies, like our modern gifs, be it over a century and a half before animation movies were first made. When we look at a gif on Tumblr, let’s remember that the technique of producing such moving images made up from a small batch of individual pictures dates back to a pre-digital world - to the days before movies, photography and digital cameras.
Gif: this is the source of the 21st-century gif of a 19th-century phenakistiscope presented above. Check out some (real moving) examples here, here, here and here.

erikkwakkel:

Gifs before gifs

We all love gifs - those highly entertaining movable feasts that are so popular on Tumblr. Here is one, but it is one with a history that predates the internet. You are looking at a gif of a phenakistiscope, a 19th-century revolving paper disk imprinted with a series of drawings, which was spun so as to produce a moving image. The device was invented around 1840 by Joseph Plateau. Dancing figures, jumping monkeys, acrobats, and figures jumping into the mouths of lions: Plateau’s stroboscopic disks produced highly entertaining mini-movies, like our modern gifs, be it over a century and a half before animation movies were first made. When we look at a gif on Tumblr, let’s remember that the technique of producing such moving images made up from a small batch of individual pictures dates back to a pre-digital world - to the days before movies, photography and digital cameras.

Gif: this is the source of the 21st-century gif of a 19th-century phenakistiscope presented above. Check out some (real moving) examples hereherehere and here.

Jan 8
myshrinkingviolet:

heysawbones:

fuckyeahpixivranking:

「絵のあれこれ」/「江川仮名子@通販ナウ」

I don’t think I’ve been this impressed with a guide in a long time. Wow. What a great way to think about hands and feet!

Ooh, I like this a lot!! Color Coded For Your Convenience? :D

myshrinkingviolet:

heysawbones:

fuckyeahpixivranking:

絵のあれこれ」/「江川仮名子@通販ナウ

I don’t think I’ve been this impressed with a guide in a long time. Wow. What a great way to think about hands and feet!

Ooh, I like this a lot!! Color Coded For Your Convenience? :D

levicorpus12:

Concept art of Elsa - Frozen

yamino:

ablogorsomething:

Concept art for princess Tiana.

I loved her concept art so much, especially with her hair down.

(Source: theprincessofarendelle)